A map to find your way through Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s day comes but once a year, and love it or loathe it, you cannot avoid the commercial juggernaut that is the Valentine’s card, in the UK and US at least. Valentine’s cards have really only been around for a few hundred years but the sentiment of describing romantic love visually has been around for much longer… And sometimes through the (usually tongue in cheek) format of the map.

Our urge to understand the world through maps has been subverted to the concept of mapping emotional territory, skipping away from physical geography and heading, map in hand to the undulating but sometimes terrifying Lands of Love.

A_Map_of_Womans_Heart

This first map of ‘the Open Country of a Woman’s Heart’ was created in the USA some time in the 19th century by a ‘lady’. I have a suspicion though, that this was by a man with no high opinion of women. Clues lie in the geography of a place, ‘exhibiting … the dangers to travellers therein’.  Journeys need to be navigated through the frightening regions of Fickleness, Coquetry and Sentimentality. Oh – and there’s a steamboat that will take you from the Sea of Wealth to the Land of Selfishness.

John_Douw_Map_of_Matrimony_1827_Cornell_CUL_PJM_1043_01

The anonymous artist who created the next Map of Matrimony seems to have a more balanced view of relationships. Created in 1825, it looks like a genuine cartographical map at first sight but come closer, and you’ll see a land detailed with regions called The Vale of Gladness, the Region of Rejoicing and the Land of Promise. Don’t get too comfortable on your journey though, because you might also meet the Quicksands of Censure, the Coast of Desperation and the Mountains of Delay, inhabited by lawyers, apparently.

There are several other beautiful examples of these kind of maps and they were all inspiration for my own map of a heart. Mine is pure Romance with a heady dose of idealism. There is no cold cynicism here, despite an image based on a scientific diagram rather than the traditional icon. Yes, dear readers, that’s really what a map of my heart looks like. Even if I get grumpy when I’m hungry, I sure need a lot of sleep and I’ve got a thing about overhead lighting, the interior geography of my heart is still gentle. Perhaps a swim in the River of Realism might be refreshing as inhabiting those lands is never that easy.

a map of my heart200 cleaned up

So to all of the lovers out there, who cheerfully wander the ‘Meadows of Can’t Wait for the Next Time to Hold You’, I wish you safe travels.

But although my map may be idealistic, it was at least made with kindness so I send it as a Valentine’s card to those whose journey is harder. To those unrequited lovers who get caught in the ‘Rapids of Pining for the Unavailable’, to those with loves who are lost across metaphorical mountains, to those who have lost all hope and those who are simply working out if it’s OK to journey on their own. I wish you a very happy Valentine’s and an easy route to navigate whichever Land of Love you find yourself in.

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A short post about a film poster

It’s way too early for Christmas (is it??!!) but this is a short post about a poster I did for a little indie film, ‘Home for Christmas’ a few years ago that has now been bought up by Amazon Prime and trending as I speak…

home for christmas poster

The film – a Christmas romcom-  was made by Jump Start films based in Brighton on a very tight budget.  Much of the work was volunteered and it was made often using local actors in Brighton itself – my flat even starred as a location at a couple of points.

Any money was crowd funded through donations, events and raffles:

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Fundraising event poster

There was a premiere at the famous historic Brighton cinema – The Duke of Yorks – one of the oldest working cinemas in the UK.  The cinema plays an important part in the storyline and I happened to have a few shifts tearing tickets there at the time alongside the Director, DoP, and Sound.  It was fun to be involved in the making of a feature film and see behind the curtain of what it takes to pull something like this off.

The illustration for the poster was hand drawn in black ink and shows some characters from the film and elements from the cinema, almost a character in itself. Colour was added digitally at a later date.

It’s taken a few years for this little film to get to this point and I’ll look forward to seeing where it goes next.