A Map of The Silver Screen Heritage of Brighton and Hove

I live in the seaside city of Brighton and Hove on the South Coast of England which has, for centuries, had a name for it’s creativity. So it really should be no surprise that it was once a centre for English film making in those black and white days of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. My latest map was commissioned by Carousel, an arts charity, as a special edition publication to promote ‘Modern Marvels’, a festival celebrating this cinematic heritage and new work by students with learning disabilities.

Early filmmakers, George Albert Smith and James Williamson lived in Hove, working on film between 1897 and 1905, a period when it developed as a new technology and a new form of entertainment. They both made important contributions to the art of editing and narrative.

Was sleepy Hove, the Hollywood of it’s day? – I don’t know(!?), but one of the first major film studios in Britain was based in St Anne’s Well Gardens there, a sedate park with tennis courts and a bowling green today. George Smith, a former stage hypnotist and psychic, created his ‘film factory’ in a glass house in the Gardens in 1897. Films were inspired by his experience of contemporary music hall, mesmerism and the magic lantern. They tell stories of steam trains, hapless housemaids and the wonders of X-rays using clever editing trickery.

George Smith at work.

One of James Williamson’s first films was a short, made on location at Brighton’s West Pier in the hot summer of the late 1890’s showing bustling crowds enjoying the holiday atmosphere. He then developed Smith’s techniques into longer multi-shot narratives. Action films and comedy capers followed, all shot around the city or in his own studio in Cambridge Grove, also in Hove.

James Williamson.

The handpainted map shows the sites of both studios but also the film locations with tiny vintage camera icons. I gave the lettering, compass rose and border a hint of Art Nouveau, the predominant style at the time, and the negative space (the space between the details) became a cinema-velvet-curtain red.

Carousel’s film festival, Modern Marvels, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, runs until November 2018. A travelling film booth shows the original black and white films alongside films made by students with learning disabilities, autism and additional needs. The project gave them an insight into film-making and visual story-telling, using green screen, making music and sound effects, working alongside experienced film-makers.

 

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New hand drawn map workshop dates.

A short post to let you know I’m running two hand drawn mapping workshops at the Towner Gallery in Eastbourne, Sussex. Both workshops will have the same format so if you can’t make the August date, perhaps the September date might be better for you.

carousel compass rose

As part of the workshop, students will learn:

– how to research the territory with notes and sketches. (NB: there will be a short walk around Eastbourne).
– simple gridding up techniques.
– how to use negative space effectively with pattern, illustration or stories.
– how to create decorative compass roses and cartouches.
– how to design personalised feature icons and keys.
– easy to draw but simply elegant hand lettering.

Camp No-mans Land compass rose

These workshops are running in association with the Towner’s current Arts Council Collection National Partner exhibition, ‘At Altitude’, which is a ‘ selective look at the historical impact and the continuing appeal of the aerial image.’ I’ve been and it really is worth seeing.

river don compass

 

Inspired by sources ranging from the first air balloons to Google Earth, the show features work by luminaries such as Jananne Al–Ani, Michael Andrews, Ken Baird, Tacita Dean, Charles and Ray Eames, Simon Faithfull, Mishka Henner, Dan Holdsworth, Kabir Hussain, Peter Lanyon, Christopher R. W. Nevinson, Cornelia Parker, Carol Rhodes and Wolfgang Tillman. There’s also a new installation created by Timothy Prus of the Archive of Modern Conflict and a site-specific commission for Towners Collection by Annabel Howland.

zoopraha compass

 

Workshop dates:

Sunday 12th August. 10.30am – 4pm.

Saturday 15th September. 10.30am – 4pm.

Pay what you can. Suggested donation – £45.00 although no-one will be excluded on ability to pay. Book for one session only.

The workshop is for all creative abilities.  Please be aware that, weather dependent, there will be a short walk as part of the workshop so wear appropriate clothing and footwear.

Book here.

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