The City Mouse and the Country Mouse

Another double page spread illustrating a poem – The City Mouse and the Country Mouse – for Ladybug, a ‘literary children’s magazine’, was commissioned during the spring, just as I was crawling out of my winter ‘Call of the Wild’ fug.  Ladybug is designed for children between 3-6 years old as an arts and culture magazine for the very young and as a precurser to Cricket – the original publication founded in the 1970’s as a ‘New Yorker’ for young adults. In addition to original stories and poems, there are lots of articles on the natural and cultural world, as well as songs, games, and activities introducing children to language.

The weather was veering between unseasonably warm sunshine and monsoon rains making the air smell green and the earth tumble forth wild flowers and happy weeds. This commission by Cricket Media illustrating the classic Christina Rossetti poem describing the lives of two mice, was the perfect project for those April times.

Working with Cricket Media was a smooth experience and the commission was very straight forward from the beginning.  The brief simply asked me to ‘illustrate the poem’ – interesting to see the different approach to the previous commission earlier in the year from Highlights Magazine (see previous blog post) which was more heavily art directed.  I was also encouraged to be anthropomorphic – something that isn’t so common at the moment but surprisingly enjoyable on the creative front.   I’ve pasted the rough pencil drawing below which was accepted without changes.

town and country mouse

Then I created the finished painting which was also accepted without changes. It really couldn’t have been easier…

The city mouse and the country mouseThe poem tells of the contentment of the country mouse, the beautiful simplicity of nature and the value of his friends in comparison to the sophisticated, but lonely life of the metropolitan mouse.  It’s a sentimental take on nature, perhaps very Victorian in it’s idealised view of country living, but, regardless, this warm and fuzzy commission was the perfect antedote to the raw brutality of nature and the fighting, emaciated huskies found in ‘Call of the Wild’ in December.

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Can you hear the Call of the Wild?

September  has come round quickly and finally, finally ‘Call of the Wild’ is officially published by UK based children’s book publisher, Miles Kelly and is calling to you from all good book shops…

Wolf illustration

A rip-roaring adventure, perhaps inspired by the author Jack London’s own experiences in the Klondike gold rush, was first published in 1903 as a series of installments in the Saturday Evening Post. I love the use of composition and white space in the illustration below by Charles Livingstone Bull.

Saturday Evening Post cover.

 

It found its way into book form a month later becoming an immediate success with ten colour tipped illustrations by Charles Livingstone Bull and Philip R. Goodwin and with a colour frontispiece by Charles Edward Hooper.  Since then, it has been translated into 47 languages and made into 3 films.

The novel examines ‘the law of the club and the fang’, echoing Darwin’s theory of the survival of the fittest – apparently Jack London had been reading this before he started writing.  Only the strong survive and in this book, usually the ‘strong’ are those who are in tune with the wilderness and far from the softness and stupidity of city life. The canine hero, Buck, has to hear the call of the wild and listen to the true heart of the wolf inside.  Eventually he triumphs becoming the leader of the wolf pack at the end.

‘Brown Wolf’, the short story set to finish the Miles Kelly edition, also shares this sentiment.  Brown Wolf chooses the harsh, wild but honest world of the pack dog, ever loyal to his first owner and rejects the easy life of ready food and country walks that he finds himself in.

‘Call of the Wild’ joins Miles Kelly’s collection of mini classics adapted for children: ‘The Jungle Book’, ‘The Wonderful Wizard of Oz’, ‘The Wind in the Willows’ and ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’.  Each book has the feel of a traditional classic but with a contemporary edge – 25 colour plate illustrations, spreads with illustrated borders throughout, illustrated oval chapter openers and finally full notes about the author, illustrator and themes of the book all presented in a beautiful card slipcase.

And each book is called a mini classic for good reason as they are small enough to fit neatly into the size of your hand, despite the weight of their literary credentials.

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‘Call of the Wild’ can be bought from all good bookshops!