Meet the artists! Artist in Residence for Little Green Pig

I’m excited to be appearing, very briefly(!), as an artist in residence at No Walls Gallery in Brighton on behalf of Little Green Pig as part of their pop-up event- ‘Make it up.’

Make it up.

Little Green Pig is a charity based in Brighton in the UK encouraging literacy and story writing in disadvantaged children. It runs events where kids build confidence writing stories with the help of professional illustrators and authors. Imagine their excitement creating their own picture book by the end of a session…

Time is valuable at the moment as I’m fully involved in writing and illustrating my own book (about maps) so short of helping out for an entire session, I’ll be an illustrator-in-residence for an hour on the ground floor of No Walls Gallery between 1- 2pm on 31st August.

An initial story making workshop (to be held at the gallery downstairs) will be happening on Monday 29th where children will sow the seeds for a story. Each following workshop will take those seeds and grow them into new stories so an entire garden of books will be flourishing by the end of the week.

The free workshops will happen every day from Tuesday 30th August to Saturday 3rd September, 10 am – 12 pm. The children will write a team story and then finish them off individually with help from volunteer story mentors, complete with illustrations by them and an artist. They’ll then go home with their very own book! Suitable for 8 – 12 year olds of all levels with one session available per child. To book a place please email: info@littlegreenpig.org.uk .

Different authors and illustrators will appear each day:

Tuesday 30th Aug – Writer: Laura Wilkinson.  Artist: Inko
Wednesday 31st Aug – Writer: Kate Harrison.   Artist: Helen Cann (me!)
Thursday 1st Sept – Writer: Alex Heminsley.  Artist: Jaime Huxtable
Friday 2nd Sept – Writer: Bridget Whelan.  Artist: tbc
Saturday 3rd Sept – Writer: Ed Hogan.   Artist: Phil Corbett

The professional illustrators will work on creating images for the story in their own styles with the focus fixed on the process and art of creativity rather than perfection. I think this is so important as part of making art (actually in most things…) – often, it’s the idea that something should be perfect that actually quenches true innovation and even prevents creation before anything has emerged. So expect a very happy lack of perfection!

If you are in Brighton, come and visit. I’d love to have a chat…

Post-script: I had a lovely time with Little Green Pig at No Walls Gallery.  Supplied with some excellent coffee and a highly imaginative story created by the kids earlier and brought to life by bestselling author Alexandra Hemminsley (Ig- @hemmograms), I conjured up this very quick illustration of Margot escaping on her amazing flying camel, Alan.

Alanspirational

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Event: Make it up – a Little Green Pigs pop-up event.

Email: info@littlegreenpig.org.uk

Address: No Walls Gallery. 114 Church Street. Brighton. Bn1 1UD.  UK.

Date and time of my residency:  Wednesday 31st August 2016. 1-2pm.

(other artists will be in residence for the rest of the week).

 

 

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Illustrating for Magazines – from start to finish.

As a children’s book illustrator, there are many ways I can be commissioned and not always strictly for books.  Earlier in the year, I was asked to illustrate a couple of poems for children’s magazines and I thought I’d share the process of working on these single pieces from start to finish.

Obviously each publisher and even each designer has their own way of doing things but there are a couple of hoops that an illustrator would usually need to jump through.

First, the brief arrives. Sometimes the designer has a very clear idea about how the illustration should look and is prescriptive in the details. Here is the brief from Highlights Magazine explaining how the designer envisages the illustration for the poem, ‘Hippos Hippos’.

hippo brief

Having read the brief, I interpreted it as you can see below. All my drawings are in pencil and easy enough to change and adapt.

hippos hippos #1

Once the designer had discussed it with her team, she replied with the following.  It’s clear from her response that she wanted a more photographic and less stylised illustration with details based in reality.

designers comments

So – Round 2! Although I don’t like getting changes (!), it’s good to remember that I am working for a client who knows their market and hopefully has a clear idea about what they want. As an illustrator, it can be more difficult to work with a designer who has very little idea about what they want from the finished piece and therefore, isn’t able to communicate the brief well. Often, this leads to more changes and confusion- further hard work in the long run….

Hippos hippos#2

The revised piece (with a note from me to the designer in pink).

The spread was then given the go-ahead, completed and sent.  At this point, it is usually possible for the designer to return the work again – perhaps suggesting a few tweaks here and there. As my work is created by hand this becomes more problematic than if it was digital but it’s possible to change things using collage or more opaque paint.

hippos hippos my version

The final painting was adjusted slightly by in filling the white area above the title and making the grass clumps less contrasty – and then the project was complete!

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